Firearms Transport

>> Download: Firearms Transport Guidelines (.pdf 154kb)


It is a requirement for firearms licence holders to abide by the transport requirements within the Firearms Regulations 2006.

It is the responsibility of a firearms licence holder to ensure that their firearms do not become lost or stolen or come into the possession of a person not authorised to have possession.

A firearm should not be readily accessible to a person in the normal seated position whilst a vehicle is in motion.


NON-PROHIBITED FIREARMS:

(Category A and B firearms and non-prohibited H firearms): Regulation 12A

  • The firearm must be in the unloaded condition at all times and magazines are not to contain any ammunition
  • Ammunition must be stored in a closed container completely separate from the firearm
  • The firearm should not be left unattended, and
  • The licence holder must adhere to at least one of the following requirements:
    • The firearm is to be in a locked receptacle (note: see receptacle details below), or
    • The bolt of the firearm is to be in a closed container, completely separate from the firearm, and/or
    • The firearm is to be fitted with a mechanism that locks or disables the trigger or action and prevents the firearm from being used.

PROHIBITED FIREARMS:

 

(Category C, D and prohibited H firearms): Regulation 12

 

  • The firearm must be in the unloaded condition with the magazine (if detachable), removed from the firearm
  • The bolt or breech block where possible should be removed from the firearm
  • Wherever possible, a trigger lock or a mechanism that locks or disables the action should be fitted to the firearm
  • If the firearm is not a pistol, the firearm is to be conveyed in a locked receptacle that is of solid construction or made of hardwood that is at least 10 mm thick
  • The receptacle is to be fitted with a metal lock
  • Any pistol is to be contained in a locked receptacle preferably located in the most secure area of a vehicle (such as the locked boot of a sedan)
  • The locked receptacle is not to contain any ammunition, and
  • Magazines are not to contain any ammunition.

What if the bolt cannot be removed from the firearm?

  • If the bolt cannot be removed from the firearm then:
    • The firearm must be fitted with a trigger lock or a mechanism that locks or disables the action, or
    • The firearm must be transported in a locked receptacle.

Does the container enclosing the ammunition have to be locked?

  • No, the ammunition must just be in a closed container such as a toolbox or lunch box. The glove box of a car would be sufficient.
  • It is important to remember the ammunition container must be separate to the firearm.

What would constitute a ‘locked receptacle’?

  • A locked receptacle refers to any container which can be securely closed and only operated by a key, combination or other means of locking devices, such as a safe or lockable solid gun box/case.
  • The car boot of a sedan (not a station wagon or van) is sufficient as long as it is locked.
  • It is important to remember the receptacle has to be locked.

What is meant by solid construction?

  • The receptacle must be solid or firm in construction. A cloth or material gun bag would not be sufficient, however, a metal gun case or a solid plastic or composite case would.
  • It is important to remember that the receptacle must be made from a solid material.

For further information, contact Firearms Services, Tasmania Police.