Traffic FAQ

What is the Police Infringement Notice System (PINS)?

Tasmania Police has developed a mobile application (app), the Police Infringement Notice System (PINS), which issues infringement notices electronically via tablet computers.

PINS processes the infringement electronically and it is sent to the recipient by post.

PINS features include automatic retrieval of licence, registration details and the photograph of the licence holder for identity checks.

Officers will have the ability to perform identification validation and capture geo-location data. Checks for information on prior convictions can also be made.

PINS automatically inputs the appropriate penalty for the infringement, and has the capacity to add notes and take photos.

Infringement notices enable offences to be dealt with without a court appearance. Around 90,000 infringement notices are issued by Tasmania Police each year.

There will be significant efficiencies from PINS. It is anticipated that the savings in police time and paperwork will amount to 39 police hours a day, or $250,000 annually.

PINS can be used for most infringements, including:
> Traffic Offences
> Gaming Control Regulations
> Animal Welfare and Parks & Wildlife Offences
> Environmental Offences
> Liquor and Crowd Controller Offences
> Licensing and Litter Offences
> Public Health Regulations
> Fisheries Offences
> Breathalyser Infringements.


What if there is an error on the electronic infringement? Is it valid?

The likelihood of an error within an infringement is slight. Information is automatically retrieved from the Department of State Growth Motor Registry System. The application also provides assistance in selecting the type of infringement to be issued. Errors including spelling will not render the infringement invalid.


What if I didn’t get the posted infringement notice because I have moved, or not changed my address or the notice is lost?

The issuing officer will request the current postal address for a person who allegedly committed an offence and the infringement notice will be sent to that address. By law, a member of the public is required to provide an officer with their current name and address if an offence had allegedly been committed. Allow four days to receive the infringement notice in the mail. It is important to give your current postal address to the police officer at the time of the alleged offence. If you don’t, this may result in further charges being laid. More information on infringement notices is available on the Monetary Penalties Enforcement Service website.


I have received an Infringement Notice. What should I do?

If you are issued an Infringement Notice, you have 28 days to take one of the following actions:


What happens if I don’t pay my Infringement? Will I just get a Summons?

In accordance with the Monetary Penalties Enforcement Act 2005, a driver has 28 days to take action in relation to an Infringement Notice they have been issued; this may include Lodgement of a Notice of Election for a Court Hearing with the Monetary Penalties Enforcement Service. Failure to take action on an Infringement Notice within 28 days will result in the driver being deemed convicted and further financial/regulatory sanctions may be imposed by the Monetary Penalties Enforcement Service.


I need to hand in my drivers licence. What should I do?

You must surrender your Drivers Licence to Service Tasmania.


I’ve been in a traffic crash, what should I do?

Details on what to do if you are involved in a traffic crash are available on the Accident Records section of this site.


Can I obtain a copy of a Traffic Crash Report?

Details on how to obtain a Traffic Crash Report (including fees) are available on the Accident Records section of this site.


I was caught twice by Speed Cameras in a short period of time. Can I have some leniency?

A driver may be entitled to leniency for a Speed Camera Infringement Notice when two or more offences have been detected in a short period of time. If the second or subsequent offence occurred prior to the offender being served with the first Infringement Notice, the driver can make a written application to Traffic Liaison Services for the demerit points to be withdrawn for the second offence. Strict conditions apply and both fines must still be paid.


I received an Infringement Notice from a Speed Camera. Can I view the camera photograph?

A driver or owner who wishes to view the Speed Camera Photograph relating to an Infringement Notice they have incurred, may do so during business hours, at any police station. A reproduction of a Speed Camera Photograph (of an incident involving you or your vehicle) can be obtained by contacting Traffic Liaison Services and quoting the Infringement Notice number. A service fee may apply. For further information, contact Traffic Liaison Services.


My company car has received an Infringement Notice. A number of people could have been driving the vehicle when the Infringement was issued. What should I do?

If a company car has received a Speed Camera Infringement Notice, you should first view the Speed Camera Photograph to identify the driver. A Speed Camera Photograph can be viewed during business hours, at any police station. You can obtain a reproduction of a Speed Camera Photograph, a service fee may apply. For further information, contact Traffic Liaison Services. If the vehicle is registered to a company or organisation, a Notice of Demand is issued by Tasmania Police requesting details of the offending driver at the time the Infringement was issued. Failure to Comply with a Notice of Demand carries a penalty of $1,300 and suspension of the vehicle’s registration for 14 days. Additional Monetary Penalties Enforcement Service sanctions may apply.


How many Demerit Points do I have left on my licence?

Basic Drivers Licence holders cannot accumulate 12 demerit points over a three year period. Provisional or Learner Drivers Licence holders cannot accumulate 4 demerit points over a twelve month period. Drivers Licence and Demerit Point inquiries should be addressed to the Transport Branch of the Department of State Growth.


I have committed an offence and will lose my licence through loss of Demerit Points. When do I have to stop driving?

You are convicted of an offence when (a) you pay the Penalty Fee associated with your Infringement, or (b) 28 days have lapsed from the Date of Infringement and you have not paid the Penalty Fee. Once convicted, the Registrar of Motor Vehicles will notify you of the start and end date of the licence suspension or disqualification. Further information is available on the Transport Tasmania website.


I will lose my licence due to this offence through loss of Demerit Points. Can I have some leniency?

For a driver to lose their licence usually means the driver has committed a serious driving offence or has had a significant driver offending history (accumulating demerit points). If you are about to lose your licence, you may be eligible for a:

Period of Good Behaviour – information available on the Transport Tasmania website.

Restricted Licence – information available from your nearest Magistrates Court.


I didn’t get a licence or vehicle registration renewal advice from the Department of State Growth, and now I have an infringement. Who is responsible for that?

It is not a requirement of the Department of State Growth to remind drivers of the impending expiry of their drivers licence or registration. It is the responsibility of licence holders or vehicle owners to be aware of the expiry dates of their licences or registrations, and renew them before they expire. Many licence holders and vehicle owners fail to notify the Department of State Growth of a change of address, which they are required to do within seven days. Further information is available on the Transport Tasmania website.


I sold my car but I do not have the details of the new owner. I have received an Infringement Notice for an offence committed in the vehicle after I had sold it. What should I do?

If you were not the offending driver of the vehicle when the Infringement Notice was issued, you are required to complete a Statutory Declaration nominating the driver/new owner of the vehicle. Completed Statutory Declarations should be forwarded to Traffic Liaison Services. If you sell your vehicle it is your responsibility to lodge a Notice of Disposal with Service Tasmania within seven days. Failure to do so is an offence. If you are unsure of the details of the new owner you should make enquiries with Service Tasmania or the Department of State Growth. You are also required to submit a Statutory Declaration to Traffic Liaison Services.


How do I know what the penalties are for Traffic Infringements?

Details of all offences can be found on the Tasmanian Legislation website.


Can I be booked for using my mobile phone whilst stationary at traffic lights?

Regulation 300(1) of the Traffic (Compliance and Enforcement) Regulations 2011 states that the driver of a vehicle must not use a hand-held mobile phone whilst the vehicle is moving, or is stationary but not parked. This includes in a line of stopped traffic. The term ‘use’ refers to more than just speaking on the phone. Handling the phone in any way is classed as ‘using’ it and is regarded as an act of Inattentive Driving. Picking up a phone, looking at a phone screen, turning a phone off, or passing a phone to another person all amount to ‘using’ the phone. Statistics show that a driver using a mobile phone is 25% more likely to be involved in a crash. Drivers texting are 45% more likely to be involved in a crash.


Is it ok to wear my seatbelt under my arm?

Regulations specify that seatbelts must be worn in a motor vehicle that is ‘moving, or is stationary but not parked’, and that they must be worn ‘properly adjusted and fastened’. This means it is a requirement for seatbelts to be worn firmly over the shoulder and around the lap.


I have a medical condition which makes it difficult to wear my seatbelt. Do I still need to wear one?

The Registrar of Motor Vehicles can issue a Seatbelt Exemption Certificate for medical reasons. To be eligible, a Medical Practitioner must issue a Medical Certificate stating the nature of the injury or medical condition and request the Registrar to issue an exemption from the requirement to wear a seatbelt. Certificates must be carried with the person at all times.